Green: Computing Nature

Habitat

Tuesday

10/05/22

16:30

-

19:00

Jennifer

Morinay

When birds spy on their neighbours

NTNU

When they need to make important decisions, animals, including humans, rely on their own experience, but also sometimes cue on other individuals and copy other's decisions. I studied why different individuals do not have the same propensity to rely on information obtained by cueing on others. In particular, I looked at how personality and cognitive differences shape this behaviour.

Wouter

Koch

Training computers to recognize species

NTNU

There are 45,000 species of animals, plants and fungi in Norway, way too many for anyone to recognize. We need to recognize them when registering where they are though, so we can protect them. Artificial Intelligence can help with that: it learns to recognize species from images to tell you what's what. But how does that actually work? How can we make it better? And will we still need biologists?

Arpenik

Kroyan

Tiny computers in our body and how can we study them - Subtitle: Molecular Dynamics of RNA

NTNU

About 5 % of our cells is built with RNAs - tiny molecular machines performing all sorts of tasks, from coding and decoding to maintenance. Only recently most of us got a little extra boost of them, through COVID-19 vaccine. Even more excitingly, those same tiny molecules are thought to hold an answer to where and how life came from on Earth about 4 billion years ago. And why it looks the way it does. But how can study them? Computer Simulations come to our rescue.

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