Special event: Polar Pint of Science Tromsø
Pint of Science Norway and the Nansen Legacy project invite you to an exciting evening full of hot science from a frozen world!
Join the scientists deep into the Arctic, ask them all you always wanted to know about the top of the world, and test your knowledge of all things Arctic by
joining our nationwide Polar pub quiz.
Storgata Camping
Storgata 5, 9008 Tromsø, Norway
11/10/21, 17:00
20:00
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A white, frozen desert, ice reaching as far as the eye can see. Breaking its way through this endless plain of ice is the research ship RV Kronprins Haakon, leaving thick boulders of ice in its wake. On board are 35 scientists of the Nansen Legacy research project, eager to collect biological, physical, and chemical data about this pristine place at the end of the world.

However, what exactly are polar scientists doing on the ice in freezing cold temperatures? What do they do during countless hours in the lab?

During this event, you will get first-hand insight into the life as a polar scientist and learn more about the projects of six early career scientists within the Nansen Legacy project. You will get to try out sampling equipment and meet some of the ocean critters in person.

Postdoc

NPI (The Norwegian Polar Institute)

Twitter:@OyvindOcean

Øyvind Lundesgaard

Where the Gulf stream goes to die

A vast ocean current, commonly known as the Gulf Stream, stretches from the Gulf of Mexico, across the Atlantic Ocean, and into the Nordic Seas. The warm current flows up the Norwegian coast, and after it passes by us in Tromsø, it continues northward, extending its longest branch into the Arctic Ocean itself. In this short talk, you will hear about how researchers are tracking the pathways of the warm Atlantic Water into the cold and icy polar ocean.

PhD

UiT

Christine Gawinski

The tiny rulers of the Arctic Seas

A white, frozen desert, ice reaching as far as the eye can see. Even though the Arctic might look lifeless on first glance, it is actually worth to take a second look. During this talk you will dive into a world full of secret wonders and hidden beauty four kilometers below our feet.

Postdoc

NPI (The Norwegian Polar Institute)

Twitter:@NadjejdaEspinel

Nadjejda Espinel

The unknown evil twin of global warming: ocean acidification in the Arctic

Anthropogenic stressors such as ocean acidification (OA) and ocean warming (OW) are negatively impacting marine ecosystems all over the world. Arctic ecosystems are among the most sensitive ecosystems to these stressors: some of the fastest rates of acidification have been reported in the Arctic, warming is happening at faster rates in the Arctic than elsewhere, and the volume of sea ice is declining from year to year. These negative impacts are being exacerbated by other stressors already present in coastal ecosystems, such as pollution or freshening. In this talk, I will briefly explain how I investigate the responses of the arctic marine ecosystems to these stressors through experimental approaches.

PhD

UiT

Griselda Anglada-Ortiz

What are the popcorns of the sea and what can we learn from them?

Planktic foraminifera are popcorn-shape organisms living in the water column. They are smaller than a millimeter and cannot swim but they are food for bigger organisms. In addition, they have a shell that is sensitive to changes in the water, for example temperature. That is why these organisms are used to study the actual ocean warming and ocean acidification. When they die, they sink to the sea floor. Because their sensitivity to changes in the water, we use the shells of the dead organisms that are found deep in the sediment to study how was the ocean when they were alive.

PhD

UiT

Yasemin Bodur

What's poop got to do with it? Faeces in the ocean and their importance for Climate Change

Every year, over 10 billion tons of carbon are removed by sinking particles in the ocean. This is as much as the CO2 emissions of about 2500 coal-fired power plants per year. An important part of these sinking particles is poop from tiny, but numerous small animals.

Postdoc

UiT

Twitter:@AmandaFZiegler

Amanda Ziegler

Food for thought: What feeds seafloor animals in the Arctic?

Come meet some of the unique animals that inhabit the seafloor of the Northern Barents Sea and deep Arctic Ocean. How do they live? What is their role in the ecosystem? You will also learn how scientists collect these animals and study their diets using stable isotope analysis.